dojo

Bedroom Lessons from the Dojo

Does practicing karate give you an unfair advantage when it comes to moves in the bedroom? Some say that there’s no doubt, and we’re not just talking about self-touting karate enthusiasts! Along with an increased awareness of their surroundings those that practice martial arts also have the benefit of some of the lessons that are integral to their art. Whether its accompanying each major move with an encouraging shout or making your mind go quiet, there are plenty of lessons from the dojo that will make you a better lover as well as a better fighter.

Lesson 1: Make it LOUD!

Good karate always sounds loud with loads of shouting. In karate this is called kiai and can focus the body and mind as well as increase oxygenated blood flow to the extremities. It can also declare your fighting spirit, be a form of intimidation, self-reassurance, or a rallying war cry.
Sex can be quite similar and letting out the occasional shout is a great release, a perfect way to increase blood flow to the extremities (hint hint), and can let your other half know how much you’re enjoying it, rallying them on to an even better performance. Use some sex lubricants (browse online at SexToys247.net.au) to enjoy and be more comfortable while doing it.

Lesson 2: Make your Mind Quiet

When you fight you should tune out everything but your enemy and in the bedroom it’s a good idea to do the same, of course in that situation it will most likely be your lover, not your enemy. While distractions can be deadly during a fight they might do the same to your love life. For those that find themselves unable to put away their internal debates over what’s for dinner or details about tomorrows car pool try silently describing everything your partner is doing to you. It won’t take long for every flick of their tongue to have your full attention and completely silence that inner monologue.

Lesson 3: Live for the Moment

When you’re practicing karate you can’t know exactly how a fight will end up despite what you’re hoping for. Your opponent might pull out a new move you weren’t expecting or do something you really don’t like. The same can happen in the bedroom and spending too much of the experience thinking about what you wish would happen will take you out of the moment and leave you unable to savour the pleasure at hand. In karate the practice of “no mind” holds that the martial artist be open to anything and attached to nothing. It’s a great lesson to take towards sex, in other words stop worrying about having an orgasm and enjoy every touch, sensation, and the path they lead you.

Lesson 4: Feel the Power of the Hips

The center of stability and power for martial arts lies in the hips. You don’t just throw a punch from your shoulder but rather turn your hip into it. The punch becomes stronger and has more impact as it’s backed by the core muscles. Those hips can be used to similar effect in bed by getting on top and rotating those hips as though playing with a hula hoop. Otherwise try to make repetitive half circles, similar to a windshield wiper. It will make the vaginal walls more receptive thanks to an increased blood flow to the area as well as definitely driving him wild.

References:
1. http://www.academia.edu/179550/The_Globalization_of_Martial_Arts
2. http://www.chicagonow.com/pow-mixed-martial-arts/2010/02/improve-sexual-pleasure-and-performance-with-martial-arts-mma-training/
3. http://www.mid-day.com/articles/mixed-martial-arts-champ-dishes-out-sex-tips/16659189
4. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/jka/etiquette.html
5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4135064/

vs

Tae Bo vs. Running

Which is the more effective workout?

Looking to lose weight or enjoy the benefits of a super intense workout? Then Tae Bo and running are two great choices. Fans of both are of the diehard variety and have some fairly persuasive arguments to make in favour of their sport. Both are high-impact exercises that will provide a great aerobic workout for the lungs and the heart and will work wonders for strengthening and toning muscles.

And while both are great for weight loss, strengthening, and overall enjoyment, one seems to outrank the other when all these factors are considered together.

Tae Bo

An exercise regiment created by seven time martial arts champion Billy Blanks, exercising along to a Tae Bo video feels like you’ve got a personal trainer in your living room. Standing for Total Awareness Excellent Body Obedience this system is highly refined and will work you like a dog. It’s extremely high-impact and the high energy routines simulate martial arts sessions though don’t expect to finish a routine and come out ready for a fight; Tae Bo is not for self-defense. Combining elements of Tae Kwon Do, boxing, and dance with a hip hop soundtrack, you’ll burn a high amount of calories per session, more than the average aerobics class.

Running

You’ll see runners out searching for their next endorphin high in all sorts of weather and they do it because it makes them feel great. It’s a great cardiovascular workout that will incrase the elasticity of the arteries to reduce high blood pressure and reduce stress. It’s been proven to increase bone density and it’s easy to plan around your schedule since you can do it just about anywhere. It’s great for your health and has even been shown to lower the risk of mortality by 19 percent over non-runners. Running also burns a high amount of calories

So Which is Best?

Both running and Tae Bo are easy to get started with little equipment besides some shoes and maybe a DVD for the Tae Bo. They’re practical and have great benefits for the body, and though running can be a great comfort to some with its repetitive motion those looking for something a bit more appealing find that the diversity offered in Tae Bo is better motivation. You’ll work hard but in the process you’ll dance, kick, and punch your way to working different muscle groups than most people use in their daily routines. Tae Bo burns an average of 500 to 800 calories per hour while running will depend on the runners weight and intensity level; the faster you run the more calories you burn. So those out for a lazy jog won’t end up with much effect but someone running up and down the stairs will burn a ton of calories.

For those looking for the best boost to their exercise regiment then there’s no trouble combining the two and many Tae Bo enthusiasts are avid joggers or runners. The running gives them a peaceful workout while Tae Bo is intensive and works on a variety of muscles.

References:

1. http://healthpsych.psy.vanderbilt.edu/HealthPsych/TAEBO.htm
2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3538395/
3. http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/running-health-even-little-bit-good-little-probably-better-201407307310
4. http://bryant3.bryant.edu/~jrideout/HealthBenefits.htm
5. http://www.livestrong.com/article/16440-benefits-tae-bo/

martial arts

Ready to fight? Pick the Martial Arts Style that Suits You Best.

A guide to the most popular martial arts styles you can take a class in.

It pays to do your research before signing up to a martial arts class, after all you’re about to pay money for someone to beat you up a couple of days a week. It can be a rewarding move for your overall well being, a great mode of self defense, and a fun way to increase your fitness level. But if you don’t pick the martial arts class that suits you best there’s less chance of you sticking with it.

Here’s our quick and easy guide to some of the most popular styles that you can find classes in, besides regular karate.

1. Judo

We’re starting our list off with some of the basics. Judo classes are fairly easy to find and it’s even an Olympic sport. Judo hails from the late 19th century Japan and if you’re looking to throw some punches then this isn’t the martial arts for you. Concentrating on throws and chokes, you can expect to get thrown on the ground a lot and practicing falling down so you don’t get hurt will be a large part of your training. A practical form of self-defense Judo will also work on your core and your grip.

2. Tae Kwon Do

A Korean form of martial arts Tae Kwon Do is an extremely broad form of study. Like Judo it’s an Olympic sport and many are familiar with it from movies and the flying kicks that made their way into popular video games like Mortal Kombat and Street Fighter. Going to a Tae Kwon Do class will mean lots of drills, sparring, cardio, and breaking stuff like boards and bricks with hands and feet. There’s a lot of variety in programs and often lots of gear to buy, but that generally means more protection for you.

3. Kickboxing/Muay Thai

While kickboxing is frequently used as a blanket term for anything involving both kicking and punching Muay Thai is somewhat more specific. From Thailand, Muay Thai is centuries-old and involves lots of kicks and punches with everything including hands, feet, elbows, and knees. Classes are hard with lots of drills followed by some intense sparring that will leave your shoulders and hips feeling jarred. It’s an intense workout and great for those that are especially flexible. Think Jean Claude Can Damme in Kickboxer, but without so much dancing around.

4. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

An offshoot of Judo that broke off in the early 1900s Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu’s a ground-based grappling technique. The object of the art is to place your opponent in a submission hold that will either inflict so much pain that they will submit, or knock them out. A typical Brazilian Jiu-jitsu class will have lots of rolling, like a pilates class in constant attack mode. Not the best choice for self-defense and awful for those with personal space issues, but a great sport that’s lots of fun with plenty of tournament opportunities.

5. Krav Maga

Developed by the Israeli Defense Force for real life combat it uses punches, kicks, and throws to disarm an attacker. Expect training to be intense with lots of drills. You’ll learn to fight when you’re tired and come away with a tightened core. It’s an extremely practical martial arts and allows for moves that are banned in other martial arts like a kick to the groin or poke in the eye, preparing you for some real life attacks. Plus telling people you study Krav Maga sounds fairly bad ass.

6. Mixed Martial Arts

This latest martial arts craze owes a lot to the Ultimate Fighting Championship, or UFC, where contestants battle it out in a cage. Mixed martial arts, also known as MMA, consists of several parts that combine kickboxing, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and anything else that works. It’s not great for self-defense but teaches its fighters to handle diverse situations. It requires a lot of time and even more money but will offer a great workout.

References:

  1. http://judo.sportclubs.rutgers.edu/Content/Judo.asp
  2. http://www.idf.il/1283-14994-en/Dover.aspx
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24377959
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11579062
  5. https://www.msu.edu/~spock/history.html

The History of Tae Bo

From Billy Blanks’s Garage to Your Living Room

The Tae Bo exercise craze of the late 90s was more than just a fad and infomercial fodder, and it’s more popular than ever with classes taught worldwide. It’s a style similar to karate but you won’t find it used for self-defense, after all you’d look a bit silly trying to fight someone using Tae Bo; it’s a style that combines dance elements with martial arts and boxing training. Touted as providing a greater cardiovascular workout than traditional aerobics classes, it’s a great way to tone, define, and get in shape.
Back in 1976 Billy Blanks developed his first Tae Bo routine and continued to work on it throughout the 1980s while running a karate studio. He led the first Tae Bo club in Boston in 1982 and then moved his family out east to Los Angles where he and his wife gave Tae Bo classes out of their garage. He eventually fine tuned it enough to open a fitness studio in Los Angeles and attracted attention with celebrity clients like Paula Abdul. In 1998 the first Tae Bo infomercial came on TV and the DVD’s started selling like the hotcakes his clients were trying to work off. Everyone was dancing, punching, and kicking their way to better shape and feeling pretty tough while they did it.
The name Tae Bo is a combination of taekwondo and boxing but the convenient letter placement also allows it to be used as an acronym for

T-otal commitment to whatever you do,
A-wareness of yourself and the world,
E-xcellence, the truest goal in anything you do,
B-ody as a force for total change, and
O-bedience to your will and your true desire for change.

It’s been characterized by many as a superior cardiovascular workout that’s great for helping to add extra definition to the body’s musculature while it tones as well as helping to improve coordination, flexibility, and balance. Blanks claims that the added cardiovascular benefits are due to the added dance moves in what is already a high energy workout and that on average a full hour of Tae Bo will burn between 500-800 calories while a more conventional aerobics routine will usually only burn between 300 and 400 calories.

An average Tae Bo workout integrates punches, kicks, and some of the defensive techniques that are found in traditional martial arts. Workouts are designed to embrace strength, speed, and balance and are always set to a racing musical beat. Expect to sweat and work hard when you get ready to do some Tae Bo and have lots of water at hand to replace the liquid you’re sure to sweat out.

Another benefit of Tae Bo? The workout gear! Billy Blanks started on the scene in shorts, runners, and a tank top, looking more like he was on his way to the ring then to lead an aerobics video. You can wear what you want in Tae Bo as long as you have the freedom to kick, lunge, duck, and punch.

There’s a reason why Tae Bo workouts have remained as a leader in the fitness industry for almost twenty years and it has given birth to an entire new breed of High Intensity Workouts like p90X. Tae Bo started a revolutionary fitness craze and it’s never gone away, becoming an international phenomenon.

References:
1. http://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/21/style/mirror-mirror-punching-and-kicking-all-the-way-to-the-bank.html
2. http://www.taebo.com/index.php?p=page&page_id=about_us
3. http://www.livestrong.com/article/16440-benefits-tae-bo/
4. http://articles.latimes.com/1997/dec/08/news/mn-61989
5. http://www.healthdiscovery.net/articles/tae_bo.htm